How to Read a Fingertip Pulse Oximeter

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How to Read a Fingertip Pulse Oximeter?

If you have or plan to get a fingertip pulse oximeter for home use, you might have noticed that there are a few different numbers and symbols that show up on the screen. So what do they all mean?

What is the Best Finger Pulse Oximeter? (Reviews and Buying Guide)

 

If you’re looking for the answer to the above question, you’re in the right place. In this article, I’ll tell you how to use and how to read a fingertip pulse oximeter, so you can do it on your own at home and understand your results.

How to Use a Fingertip Pulse Oximeter

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Before we get into how to read your fingertip pulse oximeter, let’s first make sure you know how to properly use it (if you already know this, skip to the next section on how to read your results).

Step 1: Check to make sure your hands and fingers aren’t cold. If they are, rub your hands together to improve blood flow and warm them up.

This will make sure you get a more accurate reading.

Step 2: Squeeze the end of the pulse oximeter to open the clip, place your index finger inside and over the sensor, and close the clip over your finger.

You may feel slight pinching or pressure around your finger, but this is normal and will make sure the pulse oximeter stays in place to get an accurate reading.

Step 3: Press the power on button and try to stay as still as possible while the pulse oximeter takes your reading. For the most accurate results wait at least 10 seconds to get your reading (some pulse oximeters even recommend waiting 30 seconds).

This gives the pulse oximeter time to stabilize and get to a point where it’s most sensitive. Another thing to remember is that nail polish or fake fingernails can cause false readings, so I recommended removing either of these before taking your reading.

Step 4: Once the pulse oximeter stabilizes, it will display your results on the screen.

Step 5: Remove the pulse oximeter from your finger, and it should power off on its own.

Now that you know how to properly and accurately get your readings from your fingertip pulse oximeter, let’s discuss how to read and interpret them.

How to Read a Fingertip Pulse Oximeter

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It’s important to note that the type of parameters and how they’re displayed can vary between pulse oximeters.

Here, I’ll cover the main parameters fingertip pulse oximeters typically use and how they’re displayed.

Oxygen saturation: This is the amount of oxygen in the blood. It’s labeled as the “SpO2” on a pulse oximeter and/or is a number that’s shown as a percentage (%). A normal reading is usually between 95-100%.

Pulse rate: This is your heart rate. The units for pulse rate are always given in beats per minute (bpm).

On your pulse oximeter, it can be displayed with “PR”, “PR/min”, “PRbpm” or something of that variety next to it. For some fingertip pulse oximeters, you might also see a heart shape next to it. Normal pulse rate is usually between 60-100 beats per minute.

Perfusion index: This tells you the strength of your pulse. Not all fingertip pulse oximeters will give you a perfusion index reading. If they do, it’s usually displayed as “PI” and as a percentage value (%).

A value of less than 0.2% means that either your finger is not properly positioned on the pulse oximeter sensor or your hands are too cold because of improper blood flow.

Pulse oximeters that measure the perfusion index are helpful so you know if your pulse is strong enough to give an accurate reading.

Pulse strength: Not all pulse oximeters will show pulse strength.

This is usually a visual representation of how strong your pulse is and is often shown as a series of bars increasing in height. A strong pulse strength (or more bars) is a good sign that you will get a more accurate reading.

How to Read a Fingertip Pulse Oximeter Wrap Up

As you can see, using a pulse oximeter is pretty easy. And hopefully, the above is helpful to you in interpreting your fingertip pulse oximeter results.

What is the Best Finger Pulse Oximeter? (Reviews and Buying Guide)

As always, it’s important to stay in communication with your doctor about your use of your pulse oximeter at home and your readings.

 

How to Read a Fingertip Pulse Oximeter FAQ

 

What is a Pulse rate?

This is your heart rate. The units for pulse rate are always given in beats per minute (bpm).

What is a good pulse rate for an adult?`

For most healthy adult women or men, resting heart rates range from 60 to 100 bpm. (beats per minute). However athletes may have a resting heart rate range from  30 to 40 bpm.

How Long should I hold my finger inside a pulse oximeter?

10 seconds should be enough for an accurate result in most pulse oximeters. However some pulse oximeters recommend waiting for 30 seconds.

What does Perfusion index measure?

Perfusion Index tells you the strength of your pulse, it’s usually displayed as “PI” and as a percentage value (%).  Perfusion Index is simply a visual representation of how strong your pulse is and is often shown as a series of bars increasing in height.

What should my perfusion index be?

The normal perfusion index (PI) ranges from 0.02% to 20% showing weak to strong pulse strength. A strong pulse strength (or more bars) is a good sign that you will get a more accurate reading.

What if Pi is high in my Pulse Oximeter?

High PI (perfusion index) value means a strong signal of your pulse, therefore a higher PI value means a strong pulse strength, which is a good sign that you get more accurate reading from your pulse oximeter

What is Oxygen Saturation?

This is the amount of oxygen in your blood also labeled as SpO2 which is usually between 95-100%.

What is a  SpO2 reading in a pulse oximeter?

SpO2 translates to Oxygen Saturation reading, which measures the amount of oxygen in your blood. It usually ranges between 95-100%.

What is a normal SpO2 reading in a pulse oximeter?

 A normal reading is usually between 95-100%.

At what heart rate should you go to the hospital?

In case you feel calm, sitting and not exercising, your heart rate bpm should be below 110 bpm. A heartbeat which is faster than 110 bpm (it’s called tachycardia), is a reason to come to the emergency department and get quickly checked.

Which finger is best for a pulse oximeter?

For the best oxygen saturation accuracy use your right hand middle finger. That nail polish or fake fingernails can cause false readings, so don’t forget to remove them before taking your reading.

How accurate are pulse oximeters?

Assuming that your pulse oximeter is FDA approved, and assuming that you know how to use it properly, a pulse oximeter generally has an accuracy rate of ~4% it means your actual  Oxygen Saturation could be 4% above or below the reading.

Be aware that multiple factors can affect the accuracy of a pulse oximeter reading, such as poor circulation, your skin pigmentation, your skin thickness, temperature, use of fake nails or fingernail polish and last but not least how high is the PI value when you take the reading. Higher PI value means more accuracy in your pulse oximeter reading, which could reduce the 4% mistake to only 2%.

 

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